ULUKAU: THE HAWAIIAN ELECTRONIC LIBRARY
Kikokikona Hawaiʻi
Help
Book | Hardcopy | Search | Contact
Page 99
< previous page       next page >
[ Original Images ]   [ Detach Text ]   [ No Highlighting ]

The text given here is complete but in a rough layout. Use the text to quickly check the page and then view the original page for the correct layout.

The Story of Maui Royalty

Princess Kamamalu Was Kamehamehaʻs Daughter

By KAPIIKAUINAMOKU

Article 46

The Children of Kalakua

The Princess Kalakuau-Kaheiheimalie and Kamehameha the Great and three children. The eldest was a son, the Prince Liholiho the First, surnamed I-Kaiwi-o-kamehameha.He died as a child. Their eldest daughter was the Princess Kemamalu (known also as Kamehamalu). She was the Queen-Consort of her half-brother, Prince Liholiho, who later become king of Hawaii under the style of Kamehameha II.

She died in London in the year 1824 while visiting Britain with her royal husband.

THE THIRD child was also a daughter; she was given the name Kalani-Ahumanu-I-Kaliko - Oiwi - Kauhipua-o-Kinau known in history as the Princess Kinau and surnamed Kaahumanu II under which title she exercised the powers of the office of Kuhina Nui(Grand Minister) of Hawaii.

She married the Chieftain Matthew Kekuanaoa whom some genealogists claim was the son of Nahiolea and Inaina while others claim him to be the son of Kiilaweau, the grandson of Alapai, King of Hawaii, and the Chiefess Kahoowaha of Moana.

WE CANNOT BE certain which is correct, yet we tend to believe that his correct genealogy is a combination of the two above versions, to wit:

King Alapainui of Hawaii married Keaka-Luahine and begat Keawe-Opala who wed the Princess Moana and begat Kanaina the Great, surnamed Kaleimano-I-Kahoowaha, who wed his cousin, Kalani-Kukau-a-Laa and begat Kiilaweau who wed Kahoowaha, sister of Kanaina the Great, and begat Nahiolea who wed Inaina, the daughter of Kuimeheua II. and begat Matthew Kekuanaoa, and his brothers Kanihomauoie and Nahiolea II.

IN ANY CASE, the Princess Kinau and Kekuanaoa had five children. The eldest was the Prince David Kamehameha who died as a child. The next was the Prince Moses Kekuaiwa whose poignant and tragic life we shall one day chronicle when we can find superlatives miserable enough to express our own contempt for and disgust with those persons who contributed to his humiliation.

The third child of the Princess Kinau was the Prince Lot Kamehameha. This prince was born Dec. 11, 1830, and succeeded his brother to the throne of Hawaii on Nov. 30, 1863. He ruled under the style of Kamehameha V. After a reign of nine years, he died on his own birthday Dec. 11, 1872. He was one of the greatest of Hawaiiʻs kings.

THE FOURTH child of kinau was the Prince Alexander Iolani Liholiho who was born on Feb. 9, 1834. Fostered by his uncle, King Kamehameha III, he succeeded to the Hawaiian throne as Kamehameha IV on Jan. 11, 1855. Prince Alexander married Emma Rooke, the High-Chiefess Kaoanaeha, who later in life after the death of her husband and son took the surname Kaleleonalani as a memorial to their deaths.

She was a granddaughter of John Young, the Englishman who was such a close friend of Kamehameha that the latter elevated him to the chieftainship of the realm under the name of Olohana I:

THROUGH HER grandmother, the Princess Kaoanaeha, Emma was a direct descendant of King Kelaniepuu of Hawaii through the Prince Kaleipaihala (known also as Kalaipaihala and Kalanipaihala).

The only son of Alexander and Emma was Albert Edward Kauikeouli the Prince of Hawaii who died as a child of only four in the 1862. The next year Kamehameha IV followed his son in death.

The last of the children of Kinau was the Princess Victoria Kamamalu who died without issue. The only man that she ever loved was an Englishman named Monsrrat who was later created a High-Chief of Hawaii under the name of Kealiipuahau-Puna-hele-o-Kalani.


Look up any word by double-clicking on it.

This site is made possible by the support of the Department of Education‚ and Ulukau's other supporters.
Computer Issues | More information